On the Subject of Perplexing Wires

Complicated Wires just isn’t complicated enough.

  • Look at each wire: there is a “★” symbol above the wire and an arrow symbol below the wire, as well as three small LEDs on the side.
  • For each wire, use the Venn diagram below to decide whether or not to cut the wire. The meanings of the colors and letters in the Venn diagram are described on the next page.
BCQHIJLRBVFPCHURFJTQWVPDUTIMWILD
RedOrangeYellowGreenBlue
The wire is red, yellow, blue, or white. The wire shares the same color as its arrow. The wire’s star is black. The wire’s position on the bottom is even. The wire crosses another wire.[1]
LetterInstruction
CCut the wire.
FAlways cut the wire, but only cut it first.
LAlways cut the wire, but only cut it last.
WCut the wire if more of the LEDs are on than off.
TCut the wire if the top LED is on.
UCut the wire if its arrow points up or down.
MCut the wire if the arrow points down or right.
HCut the wire if the wire shares a star with another wire.
PCut the wire if its position at the bottom is equal to the number of ports.
BCut the wire if its position at the bottom is equal to the number of batteries.
ICut the wire if its position at the bottom is equal to the number of indicators.
QCut the wire if the color of the wire is unique.
JCut the wire if, at the bottom, it is adjacent to an orange or purple wire.
VCut the wire if the serial number has a vowel, or if the bomb has a USB port.
RCut the wire if its arrow direction is unique.
DDo not cut the wire.

[1] Specifically, two wires are considered “crossing” if their top connectors (near the stars) are in the opposite order from their bottom connectors (near the arrows).