On the Subject of int##

Brain...freeze?

The string of numbers in the screen represents a program — a series of instructions — that computes a string of three digits 0–9. Trace the execution of the program (starting with the instruction on the far left) to obtain the three digits computed, then use the instruction buttons to enter the result.

Instructions

The three digits start out at 0. There is also a pointer pointing at one of the digits which initially points at the first.

There is also a “state” value which is initially 0.

Once the state is 5, the program terminates.

0 Move the pointer to the middle digit.
1 If the current state is 0, jump to the instruction '2' in the program. The state becomes 1.
2 The current state changes as follows: 0 becomes 3, 2 becomes 3, 4 becomes 5. Other values remain unchanged.
3 Move the pointer one digit left (wrapping around as necessary).
4 If the current digit is 9, it becomes 0, otherwise it is incremented.
5 Move the pointer one digit right (wrapping around as necessary).
6 Move the pointer to the leftmost digit.
7 If the current digit is 0, it becomes 9, otherwise it is decremented.
8 Move the pointer to the rightmost digit.
9 All digits are incremented (except digits that were 9 become 0).
EOF

(This is when execution hits the end of the program.)

The current state changes as follows: 1 becomes 2, 3 becomes 4. Other values remain unchanged. Then jump to the '1' instruction.

Input

During input, there is a pointer pointing at three input digits. The digits start out at 0, and the pointer initially points at the leftmost digit.

Using the button on the right, switch between the various commands. Use the button on the left to execute the command shown on it.

Use the '{' command to start your input.

Use the '+' and '-' instructions to move the pointer between digits.

Use the '<' and '>' instructions to increment or decrement the current digit (modulo 10).

The ',' or '.' command can be used to set all three digits back to 0.

If the '.' command is used, the '{' command must be used again to start input.

Use the '}' command to submit your input.

If the submitted answer is incorrect, the input digits are reverted to 0, the pointer is moved back to the first digit, and the '{' command must be used again to begin input.